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Board of Health vs Certified Kitchens Farmers Market

Question Why no Kitchen Certifications in Chelmsford? Quote "Never happen, Carlisle and Westford are on Septic so it goes into there yards. Chelmsford has a sewer system so absolutely not. This would require Grease Traps". I'm laughing the entire town cooks and mostly at home. Hey honey where's the bacon fat?  So, first off Mr Assistant Board of Health. BAD answer. Try again. Second, like Chelmsford a lot of residents are on sewer systems in Westford and Carlisle they too have upgraded in a lot of areas and third. I have not read of any food deaths in Chelmsford from home cooking. Conclusion: Expect future fights for rights for home kitchens and cooks with food certifictions coming soon.  
Sue Carter July 19, 2013 at 08:54 AM
I too called the BOH about being able to sell my jams and jellies at the farmer's market and was told I needed a certified kitchen and it would have to be separate from my residential kitchen and would require a variance (never mind the cost!). Apparently adjacent towns certify some of the church kitchens so they can be used by individuals. Considering that jams, jellies and pickles are a labor of love with no profit margin, local canners are out of luck. Perhaps the Town of Chelmsford could make some space available at low costs for local canners so we could sell locally made jams/jellies/pickles from local produce at our farmers market.
Ed Turner July 19, 2013 at 10:18 AM
Chelmsford residents in my opinion are made to be pawns watching the local towns be able to compete in what used to be historically in time true farmers market principles. I remember growing up where even contests were done in my hometown during farmers markets on season produce, pie eating, cakes, pickles of all styles jarred jellies. We need to stop this baloney. We are the people the local government are the servants. So speak out. I've not killed anyone in my cooking or food handling yet. We are treated like children in diapers.
Sunny July 19, 2013 at 12:02 PM
Are BOH going shut down 4-H competition of jams, pickles, etc.? Please correct me, in making jams and pickles, the jars with the products are placed in water bath and process until the jars are sealed. If no sealed, you don't eat the product in the jars.
Sue Carter July 19, 2013 at 12:30 PM
My grandmother used to use the inversion method for canning (heat from product heats air creating vacuum) versus the hot water bath. I think anyone selling (or in my case giving away) canned goods uses either the hot water bath or pressure cooker to seal jars.
Anna Bucciarelli July 20, 2013 at 08:08 AM
I use hot water bath, my husband used a pressure canner and this year I bought myself a steaming canner. I am tired of the water bath, afraid of pressure cookers of any kind, and remember being loaned a steamer many years ago to sterilize baby formula and it was such a snap ... I hope this is as easy. Especially since it was not a cheap purchase!
Ed Turner July 20, 2013 at 11:34 AM
If i use cold pack method or "refrige" pickles i label it keep chilled and expires usually 14 days after packing so with the experiration date. We still go through the boil and sterilize everything process and ware food gloves during the process and handling making sure each batch that theres no way of cross contamination as the gloves are changed frequently and everything cleaned and sterilized for a new batch start. I love making the hot processed pressure cooker style sweet bread and butter pickles to store for long periods up too a year as dated and I make a couple jars cold processed n for immediate use. They don't last long as they are devoured like as if i made candy.
Ed Turner July 20, 2013 at 11:37 AM
Oh and the key to crisp crunchy pickles no matter what type are being made is fresh picked and immediate processing
Ed Turner July 20, 2013 at 11:40 AM
We pickle other veggies too, i got a nice mixed veg with cauliflower, pemento, pepper, cukes , carrot, and yes eggplant. It's old fashioned and we call it pickled veggie salad.
Anna Bucciarelli July 20, 2013 at 12:58 PM
Ed ... I've pickled some but not much and am no expert at it, as you sound. Wanna share a recipe or two?
Ed Turner November 04, 2013 at 01:37 PM
@ Sunny.... I believe the 4-H property is in Westford so Chelmsford has no jurisdiction but Westford does I believe require both food handling and kitchen certs from your town. So if your a Chelmsord resident your required to have both and won't get them. I in the past have done the Carlisle Farmers Market and they required both the food handling and kitchen certifications of which because I live in Chelmsford I'm screwed from obtaining. I found the only way to beat the system is to operate out of State, Live Free or Die is there motto, more and more it's appreciated by most vs. Massachusetts. I suggest looking up FLEE Markets in NH, since very small business outside of local grown is not a friendly venture in this town as in trying to prosper has loop holes of blockages.
Ed Turner November 04, 2013 at 02:01 PM
@ Ann Bucciarelli......Old-Fashioned Pickle Barrel Pickles Grow a good local variety of Pickling Cukes - Cukes Suggested are: Comstock, Ferre & Co., LLC 263 Main Street Wethersfield, CT 06109 Boston Pickling Cucumber 50 days. An old heirloom dating back to 1880. Vigorous vines give large yields of smooth green fruit. It is excellent for pickles, very crisp and good quality. A very popular variety at the turn of the century. http://www.rareseeds.com/boston-pickling-cucumber/ Johnny's Selected Seeds PO Box 299 Waterville, Maine 04903 Northern Pickling (OG) A high-yielding, early variety for salads and pickling. Medium green fruits bear early, and set heavily on short, space-saving vines. Fertilize well and pick frequently at a small size to maintain good color and fruit shape. Developed in Maine. Black spine. Organically grown http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-5625-northern-pickling-og.aspx Note both are Northeastern Growers INGREDIENTS: 5 pounds pickling cucumbers of uniform size (about 4 inches) 4 tablespoons pickling spices (McCormick's or mix your own) 6 bunches dill, washed and chopped 6 cloves garlic, crushed and peeled, more if desired 1 cup white vinegar 2/3 cup pickling salt 2 quarts water * 1/2 teaspoon powdered alum OR 8 grape leaves both are (optional) DIRECTIONS: Scrub pickles with a vegetable brush and rinse with cool water. Allow to dry thoroughly. In a large stoneware crock or a non-reactive deep enamel kettle, sprinkle in half of pickling spices, dill and garlic over the bottom. Layer cucumbers in crock, filling within 3 inches of top. Sprinkle with remaining pickling spices, dill and garlic. Mix vinegar, salt and alum (optional) and 2 quarts of water. Pour over cucumbers, to cover. Weight with a plate and cans, making sure cucumbers are completely submerged. Cover loosely with cheesecloth. Check pickles each day and skim off scum as it forms. They may not begin to form until fifth day. Do not stir pickles, but make sure they remain completely submerged in brine at all times. If necessary, add additional brine. Leave for 3 to 4 weeks. Pickles will turn an olive-drab color and texture will be soft-crisp and be uniformly translucent. Let stand an additional month to develop flavor, replacing brine as necessary. * Alum will help with making pickles crisp, as will grape leaves, but making theses as soon as they are picked is best and stay crisp. makes 5 lbs
Ed Turner November 04, 2013 at 02:08 PM
@ Ann Bucciarelli......Sweet Pickle Spears Grow a good local variety of Pickling Cukes - Cukes Suggested are: Comstock, Ferre & Co., LLC 263 Main Street Wethersfield, CT 06109 Boston Pickling Cucumber 50 days. An old heirloom dating back to 1880. Vigorous vines give large yields of smooth green fruit. It is excellent for pickles, very crisp and good quality. A very popular variety at the turn of the century. http://www.rareseeds.com/boston-pickling-cucumber/ Johnny's Selected Seeds PO Box 299 Waterville, Maine 04903 Northern Pickling (OG) A high-yielding, early variety for salads and pickling. Medium green fruits bear early, and set heavily on short, space-saving vines. Fertilize well and pick frequently at a small size to maintain good color and fruit shape. Developed in Maine. Black spine. Organically grown http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-5625-northern-pickling-og.aspx Note both are Northeastern Growers INGREDIENTS: 4 pounds pickling cucumbers 4 cups sugar 3 1/4 cups distilled white vinegar 2 1/2 tablespoons canning salt 5 teaspoons celery salt 1 teaspoon turmeric 1 1/2 teaspoon mustard seed DIRECTIONS: Slice ends (peel) and cut into spears. Pour boiling water over cucumbers and let stand for 2 hours. Drain, pack into hot pint jars. Leave 1/4 inch head space. Heat ingredients to a boil; pour hot liquid over cucumbers. (Leave 1/4" head space) Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps; process 10 minutes in boiling water bath. Yield makes 6 pints

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