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Longtime Chelmsford Resident, 68, Loses Battle With Cancer

Ted Buswick worked for 15 years as an English teacher at Acton-Boxboro Regional High School.

Edward Harris "Ted" Buswick. Photo: Blake Funeral Home
Edward Harris "Ted" Buswick. Photo: Blake Funeral Home
The following is an obituary courtesy of Blake Funeral Home.

Edward Harris “Ted” Buswick, age 68, a longtime resident of Chelmsford died Sunday, June 29, 2014, at his home. He battled cancer for over a year, but it was only in the last two months that his lifestyle changed. He was the beloved husband of Judith E. (James) Buswick, with whom he would have celebrated 47 years of marriage in August. 

He was born in Pittsfield, Mass., on February 6, 1946, and was the son of the late Edward W. and Florence V. “Ginny” (Harris) Buswick. He received his early education in Taunton and was a graduate of Lunenburg High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree from UMass Amherst and master’s degrees from Northeastern University and Fitchburg State College. He also studied abroad at Bangor University in North Wales. 

Ted began his expansive career at Acton-Boxboro Regional High School, where he worked for 15 years as an English teacher and later as head of the English Department. He also ran the Theater program and was a member and past president of the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild. He then went to work for ComputerLand for a brief period before moving on to the position of Senior Acquisitions Editor for Addison-Wesley Publishing and then as Director of Product Development at American Management Association. He spent over 20 years with the Boston Consulting Group working as a writer and editor and serving as the company’s Oral Historian. He finished his career sharing time between two positions; one, as a professor at Clark University’s Graduate School of Management, where he also acted as Executive in Residence for Leadership and the Arts; and the other as Director Emeritus of the National Science Foundation Grant to Encourage Arts Based Learning. 

Ted was an active member of the Central Congregational Church, singing in the choir for 40 years and helping to found the Fellowship Players, a dinner theater put on by parishioners for parishioners and friends, which lasted 25 years. In his free time he was an avid reader and loved listening to music, going to the theater, traveling especially to Wales, and watching the Red Sox and Celtics. Ted was witty and particularly enjoyed puns and plays on words. He also enjoyed writing, having co-authored and edited several books. Regardless of the endeavor, be it for work or pleasure, Ted approached each activity with optimism and a positive attitude. Whether as a teacher, director, colleague or friend, his encouraging ways helped to bring out the best in everyone.

In addition to his wife, Ted is survived by his two children, Geoffrey Edward Buswick and his wife Elizabeth of Boxford and Katherine Julia McCampbell and her husband Alexander of Andover. He treasured his five great-grandgirls: Margaret Buswick, Skylar McCampbell, Tiernan McCampbell, Charlotte Buswick, and Lorelei McCampbell. He is survived by his brother-in-law General Grant Murphy of Natick. He was also the brother of the late Donna Murphy. 

Visitation will be held at the Blake Funeral Home, 24 Worthen Street, Chelmsford on Monday, July 7th from 4 until 8 pm. 

His Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, July 8th at 10:30 at the Central Congregational Church of Chelmsford. Private interment will be in Pine Ridge Cemetery. 

In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Ted’s name to the Central Congregational Church of Chelmsford, One Worthen St., Chelmsford, MA 01824 or to the Lowell General Hospital Cancer Center, 295 Varnum Ave., Lowell, MA 01854.

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